Full-class review games using students’ smartphones (TiLT Forum 2018)

Hello, TiLT Forum!

My presentation is about two free websites that enable teachers to run full-class review games: Quizlet and Kahoot.


Quizlet.com is a free website that hosts millions of sets of student- and teacher-created flash cards.

Quizlet supports creating flash cards in virtually any language, including those with non-Latin alphabets (e.g., Chinese) or right-to-left writing direction (e.g., Arabic and Hebrew). In addition, Quizlet has text-to-speech functionality in 17 languages, including English, Spanish, French, German, Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), Portuguese, Arabic, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Turkish, Dutch, Greek, Swedish, Finnish, and Romanian.

In addition to studying your material as flash cards, you can play various games and do other types of learning exercises.

Here is a study set that I created for one of my classes recently:

https://quizlet.com/216332939/real-reading-1-chapters-1-12-flash-cards/

Quizlet Live is a new game mode offered by Quizlet.com. It’s a team game designed to be played in the classroom. Students work in groups of 3 or 4 and are incentivized to answer carefully and to discuss and collaborate with each other. Slow and steady wins the race.

Try out a demo of the Quizlet Live game here to see how it works: https://quizlet.com/livedemo

Setting up a Quizlet Live activity:

  1. Log into Quizlet.com. (This is a mandatory step!)
  2. Go to your Account Settings page and make sure you are in the system as a Teacher, not as a Student (you only need to do this one time):
  3. Open any Quizlet card set (or create your own).
  4. Click on the “LIVE” button on the card set you wish to play Quizlet Live with.
  5. Click the “Create Game” button.
  6. Instruct students to take out their phones (or other internet-connected devices) and go to quizlet.live (note that the address is .live and is NOT the same as quizlet.com).
  7. Instruct students to enter the six-digit join code and enter their names.
  8. After all students have joined the game, click the buttons on the screen to run the game.

Kahoot! is a review game somewhat similar to Quizlet Live, except that Kahoot! is a highly competitive game that incentivizes students to answer as quickly as possible.

Here is an example game I created: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/68b27a0f-776b-42ba-b896-e8672646a0d2

Setting up a Kahoot! activity:

  1. Create an account at kahoot.com
  2. Under “Create new Kahoot!”, choose “Quiz”
  3. Complete the form (title, description, etc.) and click the “Ok, go” button
  4. Click the “Add question” button to create your first question.
  5. Type your question and set the time limit / points options.
  6. Type up to four answer choices in the boxes near the bottom of the screen.
  7. Click on the checkmark next to an answer to mark it as correct. (You may mark more than one answer correct.)
  8. Click “Next” at the top right of the screen to go back to your quiz.
  9. Either…
    1. Click the “Add question” button to add another question
    2. Click the green “Save” button at the top right of the screen to save your quiz
  10. After you click “Save”, you are given options to edit, preview, play, or share your new Kahoot quiz.

Running a Kahoot! activity:

  1. Click on the “My Kahoots” button near the top-left of the page. (If you don’t see the “My Kahoots” button, try clicking the purple button with three lines near the top-right of the screen.
  2. Click the “Play” button next to the Kahoot! quiz you want to run in class.
  3. Choose either “Classic” or “Team mode”, and set any other game options you wish to use. (One popular game option is “Randomize order of answers”, for example.)
  4. Make sure students can see your computer screen via the classroom projector/monitor.
  5. Instruct your students to go to kahoot.it (not .com) on their phones, mobile devices, or laptops. Instruct them to type in the game-pin which has appeared on the classroom screen.
  6. Click “Start” when everyone is ready.
  7. Enjoy! After the activity, you can download all students’ answers from the “My results” section of the website (click on your username at the top right of the webpage).

Recorded Speaking Activity (RSA): Pedagogy, Implementation, Evaluation and Creation

I had the pleasure this past weekend to co-present about the Recorded Speaking Activity we do at my institution. Check it out below!

I presented earlier this year at TESOL International about the benefits of using Google Drive for collaborative activities, and incidentally, this is a demonstration of those benefits, as my colleagues and I used Google Slides to create this presentation together. I don’t think I posted my TESOL International presentation on this blog, but I gave a similar presentation at Three Rivers TESOL 2016.

4/3/2 in the 21st Century: Formative Assessment of Fluency through Digital Recording

Hello, Three Rivers TESOL! See below for my presentation and related resources.


Abstract

Maurice (1983) pioneered a 4/3/2 fluency activity for intermediate to advanced learners in which each student speaks on the same topic three times in shrinking time frames: four minutes, three minutes, and finally two minutes. Shrinking the time frame places pressure on students to use time economically by avoiding hesitations and increasing fluency of speech. While Maurice’s original activity had students speaking with partners and involved little teacher or student assessment of performance, the ubiquity of cheap digital recording technology (computers, tablets, smartphones, etc.) enables teachers of the 21st century to reconstruct the activity as a formative self-assessment with teacher feedback.

In my version of the activity, students watch a humorous short film full of concrete, reportable events two times (Eggleston, 2000). Students then record themselves narrating the events of the film for two minutes, after which they listen to the recording to notice their hesitations and self-assess their fluency. Students then record the same narration in one minute thirty seconds, followed by listening and self-assessment. Finally, students record the narration in one minute and again listen and self-assess. Students discuss and reflect upon their experiences, especially on the extent of self-perceived improvement. The teacher collects the final recording in order to review it and provide written feedback targeting hesitations, word linking, or other fluency-related performance targets.

Works cited:


Here are some more videos appropriate for this activity:

Four short videos to help your language students improve their fluency

Enjoy!

Upcoming ELI technology workshops!

After surveying my colleagues, I’ve put together the following provisional workshop schedule for the fall semester:

  • 10/10/14: Conducting “game-show style” activities, quizzes, and games using Kahoot
  • 10/24/14: Using online video resources and vocabulary profilers in ESL courses
  • 11/07/14: Collecting and assessing spoken work digitally—without using the computer lab

The first workshop focuses on Kahoot!; the second focuses on a plethora of video websites (especially TED.com) and the vocabulary profilers at lextutor.ca; and the third focuses on using Google Voice in the classroom.

I’m excited!