Recorded Speaking Activity (RSA): Pedagogy, Implementation, Evaluation and Creation

I had the pleasure this past weekend to co-present about the Recorded Speaking Activity we do at my institution. Check it out below!

I presented earlier this year at TESOL International about the benefits of using Google Drive for collaborative activities, and incidentally, this is a demonstration of those benefits, as my colleagues and I used Google Slides to create this presentation together. I don’t think I posted my TESOL International presentation on this blog, but I gave a similar presentation at Three Rivers TESOL 2016.

4/3/2 in the 21st Century: Formative Assessment of Fluency through Digital Recording

Hello, Three Rivers TESOL! See below for my presentation and related resources.


Abstract

Maurice (1983) pioneered a 4/3/2 fluency activity for intermediate to advanced learners in which each student speaks on the same topic three times in shrinking time frames: four minutes, three minutes, and finally two minutes. Shrinking the time frame places pressure on students to use time economically by avoiding hesitations and increasing fluency of speech. While Maurice’s original activity had students speaking with partners and involved little teacher or student assessment of performance, the ubiquity of cheap digital recording technology (computers, tablets, smartphones, etc.) enables teachers of the 21st century to reconstruct the activity as a formative self-assessment with teacher feedback.

In my version of the activity, students watch a humorous short film full of concrete, reportable events two times (Eggleston, 2000). Students then record themselves narrating the events of the film for two minutes, after which they listen to the recording to notice their hesitations and self-assess their fluency. Students then record the same narration in one minute thirty seconds, followed by listening and self-assessment. Finally, students record the narration in one minute and again listen and self-assess. Students discuss and reflect upon their experiences, especially on the extent of self-perceived improvement. The teacher collects the final recording in order to review it and provide written feedback targeting hesitations, word linking, or other fluency-related performance targets.

Works cited:


Here are some more videos appropriate for this activity:

Four short videos to help your language students improve their fluency

Enjoy!

Upcoming ELI technology workshops!

After surveying my colleagues, I’ve put together the following provisional workshop schedule for the fall semester:

  • 10/10/14: Conducting “game-show style” activities, quizzes, and games using Kahoot
  • 10/24/14: Using online video resources and vocabulary profilers in ESL courses
  • 11/07/14: Collecting and assessing spoken work digitally—without using the computer lab

The first workshop focuses on Kahoot!; the second focuses on a plethora of video websites (especially TED.com) and the vocabulary profilers at lextutor.ca; and the third focuses on using Google Voice in the classroom.

I’m excited!

My foray into the world of smartphone/tablet repair

My Nexus 7 repair didn’t work, but I have the feeling that the tablet was already water damaged beyond hope. It’s possible that a new battery might revive it, but I’m not confident enough in those odds to want to invest in the cost of a brand new battery. They’re quite pricey.

However, I did just successfully replace the battery of an iPhone 5! So that’s good. It was a multi-step process involving a fair bit of disassembly, but everything went according to plan. Getting the old battery out was quite difficult due to the strong adhesive bonding it to the shell of the phone, but after a few minutes of prying, I was able to peel it out.

In retrospect, I probably ought to have taken some photos of the process– but I was primarily focused on just getting the procedure right!

These are the items I picked up recently for working on small devices, including this iPhone repair:

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The bit set is nice for its inclusion of a plastic spudger and pentalobe bits, but the Phillips-head bits don’t run small enough. I still have to use a glasses repair kit to deal with the smallest of screws.

For the second item– I didn’t know that magnetic project work surface mats existed, but now that I own one, I love it. The idea is that you place individual sets of screws/etc grouped together within the frames, then label what they are using a dry-erase marker. The weak magnetic surface keeps stuff from sliding or rolling away. I actually used to do the same thing using pieces of paper or (perhaps bizarrely) our stovetop, since the stove surface is pure white and works well with dry-erase markets.

The magnetic wand has been a lifesaver. It’s crucial for picking up (or finding, period!) the kinds of microscopically tiny screws used in smartphones and tablets.

The ESD wrist strap is kind of basic IT equipment, but I’d never bothered to buy one before.

And the head-mounted magnifier is something I’d originally picked up for soldering, but it occasionally has its uses in working on tiny devices, too.

(One more thing: it’s good to have a strong suction cup. I used one half of the Orbit smartphone mount set, since the ball provides a great, sturdy place to grip while prising a screen off, but can then act as a kickstand to keep the screen readily accessible and easy to grab.)

I would LOVE to get the iFixit Pro Tech Toolkit:

But I really can’t justify it, given how rarely I actually crack open the shell of a device! All that other equipment listed up above COMBINED only costs HALF of what one Pro Tech Toolkit costs. It’s a shame.